HOME

BOOKS

CD

WORKSHOPS

VIDEOS/PHOTOS

PODCASTS

TESTIMONIALS

INTERVIEWS AND ARTICLES

CONTACT US

PREVIEW THE LATEST BOOK
 Facebook

Books

The Whole Spectrum of Social, Motor and Sensory Games - Excerpt

PLASTIC BOTTLE GAMES

This game is from the INCLUSION GAMES section in which one recyclable or easy to get material is used to provide a variety of games.

Plastic bottles have turned out to be a problem. At first it seemed great that so many people were now drinking water instead of colas but the excess of bottles are now an environmental hazards.

You certainly hear about recycling them and you are warned not to reuse them for drinking water.

What you don’t hear—and should—is how to reuse them to make a children’s game.

Da dum—here is that missing info!

LESSONS BEING TAUGHT:

GAME 1:  KNOCK DOWNS

Game 1: Knock Downs

Watch the video

SET-UP:

Preparing the bottles:

Preparing the site:

Choosing the ball size:

The size of the ball can vary from a tennis ball size to soccer ball size in the same game. Start with the larger size. Remember when using the smaller size ball, it is a bit easier if the bottles are closer together

DIRECTIONS:

VARIATIONS:

  1. One or two children are assigned the tasks to stand the bottles back up after being knocked down. In this variation, each child has all the bottles to knock down on his or her turn.
  2. The bottles knocked down stay down until everyone has had a turn. This increases the challenge for the last kids in line, as they have to aim the ball more accurately to hit the few remaining bottles.

GAME 2: IN AND OUT CAR

Game 2: In and Out Car

Watch the Video

SET-UP:

Place the bottles in a wide oval or circle pattern. The spaces between the bottles need to be wide enough for a child to be able to walk between the bottles.

DIRECTIONS:

Demonstrate the skill of walking in and out of the circle by going around the bottles (see illustration or video clip)

Sing or chant words to go with the movements and encourage the rest of the class to do the same.

I use words like these to a simple tune:

Go in and out the bottles
Go in and out the bottles
Go in and out the bottles
All on a beautiful day

VARIATION:

You can eventually add the challenge of body awareness by placing the bottles close enough to each other that the child has to turn her or his body sideways to go in and out of the circle. But, at first, make sure there is plenty of room to go around the bottles without knocking them down. When they get knocked down, they have to be reset up for the next team and that takes a little time away from the flow.

GAME 3: IN AND OUT VAN

Game 3: In and Out Van

Watch the Video

SET-UP:

Same set up as above—the bottles in a circle or oval pattern. You might need to widen the space between the bottles by making the circle a little bigger to accommodate the extra person.

DIRECTIONS:

Have two children do it together. Invoke the image of a van rather than an individual car going in and out of the circle.

This is especially useful if one child does not have the spatial understanding to do the movement on her own. The other child can be the leader and the less experienced child can place hands on the leader’s shoulder or on the waist

VARIATION:

You can change the mental image from a van to a horse and rider by putting a rope, scarf or ribbon around the leader’s waist. The follower can hold on to the reins as the horse leads him in and out and around the bottles.

GAME 4: IN AND OUT TRAIN

Game 4: In and Out Train

Watch the Video

SET-UP:

See above set-up directions

DIRECTIONS: 

A small train of 3 children can also hold on to each other and go in and out of the circle. Any more than three and bottles get too easily knocked over and the circle or oval pattern is lost

VARIATION:

If you want to form a larger train and use more than three players, place the bottles in a straight line instead of a circle or oval. Make sure there is a lot of room in between the bottles.

GAME 5: OBSTACLE COURSE

Game 5: Obstacle Course

Watch the Video

The obstacle course contains two motoric elements

SET-UP:

DIRECTIONS:

Ask the players to jump over the two sets of laid down bottles and to weave in and out of the others.

VARIATIONS:

You can change the order of the obstacle course using these same motoric elements

GAME 6: OBSTACLE COURSE CHALLENGE

Game 6: Obstacle Course Challenge

Watch the Video

SET UP:

To keep interest high, add an additional bottle after each person has had one turn. I like to say something such as “You were so good at jumping over two bottles, do you think you could jump over three and weave through four?” I find children get excited about the challenge and are happy to prove to me that they can!

DIRECTIONS:

When appropriate, ask children to vary their movements by jumping sideways or backwards. This is a little harder to do but even the trying to do it is a good motor control experience.

VARIATION:

Since this version of OBTACLE COURSE is about increasing the number of bottles lying down, you could add the variation of standing another set of bottles upright to jump over. This adds a new motor element—high jumping: standing bottles to jump over.

Since plastic water bottles come in different sizes, this is a good use for the smallest size.

GAME 7 :OBSTACLE COURSE CIRCLE

Using the elements of high jumping, broad jumping and weaving, place the obstacles in a circle. Widen the circle by adding other elements such as a balance beam or rocker board.

By forming a large circle, all the children can do the course at the same time. No more waiting for ones turn! I like to do this version after everyone has had two turns each. I figure they have done enough patient waiting and get to just go!

GAME 8: CREATE A VERSION

Allow one or more children at a time to reset up the obstacle course in a pattern that they create.

 

 

HomeProductsWorkshopsTestimonialsContact Us